GERMANY

KINKEL LECTURE

Former Foreign Minister, Klaus Kinkel

A historic victory for the fight against impunity for the most serious crimes! This is how Foreign Minister Klaus Kinkel declared the adoption of the Rome Statute establishing the International Criminal Court (ICC) in July 1998. Under the leadership of Klaus Kinkel, Germany had been a particular advocate for a permanent International Criminal Court in the group of so-called like-minded states and had thus earned lasting merit. Two decades later, the International Criminal Court has prosecuted the most serious international crimes (such as crimes against humanity and war crimes), indicted and convicted perpetrators, but also acquitted them. As an international court, the ICC always relies on the cooperation of States Parties. This concerns assistance with arrest warrants, the investigation of evidence and the protection of victim-witnesses. In his lecture, Prof. Dr. Bertram Schmitt, the German judge at the ICC, addresses the difficult problem of examining victim witnesses and provides an insight into the current challenges at the ICC. The first Klaus Kinkel Lecture was dedicated to the significant political commitment of the former German Minister of Justice and Foreign Affairs to the establishment of the ICC. With this event, sponsored by the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ), the Friedrich Naumann Foundation for Freedom is helping to raise awareness of the goals of the 2030 Agenda adopted by the United Nations in 2015, particularly in the area of human rights and the rule of law.

Watch the first Kinkel lecture with Michael Theurer, Parliamentary State Secretary to the Federal Minister for Digital Affairs and Transport, and Professor Bertram Schmitt, Judge at the International Criminal Court.

MORE ABOUT THE HUMAN RIGHTS WORK OF THE FRIEDRICH NAUMANN FOUNDATION FOR FREEDOM:

humanrights.freiheit.org